Tag: released study

Study Cannabis for Chronic Pain Leads to Fewer Prescription Meds

Is cannabis a reliable substitute for prescription pain medications when treating patients for chronic pain? Medical cannabis advocates have long said ‘yes’. There is a growing mountain of evidence suggesting they are correct, including¬† a recently released study from the New York Department of Health.

The New York data suggests that chronic pain patients are less likely to use prescription opioids when they are given access to medical cannabis to manage their pain. Knowing what we know about certain types of prescription painkillers, any data in support of replacing those medications with medical cannabis should not be ignored.

Cutting Opioids in Half

Researchers from the New York Department of Health analyzed patient data involving some 8,000 people enrolled in the state’s medical cannabis program. They looked at patient use of prescription medications in relation to medical cannabis consumption and noted that daily opioid use was cut in half among chronic Read the rest

Cannabis Pain Relief: How Important Is Anecdotal Data?

Millions of people throughout the U.S. use cannabis. Some use it recreationally; others use it medicinally. Among medical users, Utahmarijuana.org says that the most commonly cited medical condition is chronic pain. But does cannabis really offer pain relief? Furthermore, how important is anecdotal data in determining how well cannabis relieves pain?

A recently released study suggests that cannabis works no better than placebo at relieving pain. On the other hand, another recently released study shows that roughly a third of all chronic pain patients treat their pain with cannabis. A fair number of them report using fewer prescription cannabinoids as a result.

The two studies offer somewhat contradictory data. So at what point do we consider the anecdotal data? If people report feeling better after using cannabis, doesn’t that count for something? It does. But feeling better doesn’t necessarily equate to a measurable biological response.

Mechanisms Remain Unclear

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